10 Common Weeds that Can Heal You

This is a great graphic for 10 common weeds that heal you. Better yet, All of them can be found in your yard. They can be used to help heal sicknesses, burns, sores and other ailments. Check out our posts on food storage and other topics, and explore our huge selection of emergency supplies and other useful resources. You'd be surprised how many weeds you can find in your yard (but hopefully not) that can help heal your body and make you feel better.

10 Weeds that Heal

Excerpted from Susan S. Weed and natureskills.com. Check out some other great resources on using wild plants to your advantage.

Interested in books about edible weeds? Click here!

51 thoughts on “10 Common Weeds that Can Heal You”

  • Ja

    Great info to print out and save. Thanks

    Reply
  • Stephanie

    Great post! I have a lot of these in my yard. I suffer from migraines. I can't wait to pull weeds now. Hoping my migraines go away.

    Reply
  • Mrs. Mobunny

    I have acres of chickweed all condensed in my gardens every year about this time! (Feb.-March)
    If I could sell it, I'd be rich.

    Reply
  • Jennifer

    When you say to mix with 'alcohol' for a tincure, do you mean rubbing alcohol or liquor alcohol? Is it safe to consume rubbing alcohol, even in these small doses?

    Reply
  • mamaprepper

    I wish this were available as a poster! Such good info to keep up all the time!

    Reply
  • vilma eisbach acosta
    vilma eisbach acosta April 5, 2012 at 12:45 am

    I suffer with migraine headaches and would love to prepare the solution. I just don´t know how much alcohol and how much oil. What kind of alcohol or oil?
    I want to share with my friends this information, all 10 of them.

    Thanks a lot!!!

    Reply
  • E.W.

    To make a tincture, use 100+ proof alcohol (a clear kind preferably like vodka), and just place 1 parts fresh herbs/weeds and 2 parts alcohol in a clear glass jar. Cover the jar and keep it in a cool dark place for about a week or so (if you are extracting the roots, you need to chop up the roots and let it sit in the alcohol longer). To extract more of the medicinal quality of the plant, shake the jar once every day or two. Strain the liquid out into another container and you got your medicinal tincture.

    That's just about the basics of tincture-making. Alcoholic tinctures can last a long time (some say for 10 years), especially when stored in dark cool places. If you want more information about using herbs and such, try reading Making Plant Medicine by Richo Cech and The Woman's Handbook of Healing Herbs by Deb Soule.

    Reply
  • C.M.E.

    Great info! Just make sure you don't use plants that have been sprayed with harmful chemicals or plants that are near areas that have been sprayed. And watch out for plants in areas where pets go potty! ;)

    Reply
  • Eric

    Is there a know reason for 'white' yarrow only? I have never heard of it being restricted and have a boat load of red.

    Reply
    • The Ready Store

      From our research, it looks like white yarrow's seeds are a different size and more potent than red yarrow. However, I'd be really interested to test out red yarrow and see how it compares. If you test it out, please let us know. We'd love to hear!

      Reply
    • Steven

      There is absolutely NO difference in ANY of the colored varieties of yarrow. We use them all analogously.

      Reply
  • Kevin

    Great info. Just a small typo :
    achellia millefolium = achillea millefolium

    Reply
  • natural herbs
    natural herbs May 23, 2012 at 12:35 pm

    Great info to print out and save. Thanks

    Reply
  • Juliana

    Thank you! Is there a substitution for the alcohol? I keep it out of my system, it's best that way ;)

    Reply
  • joe

    100 proof, buy it from the liquor store.

    Reply
  • mamichgi

    I would not use Senecio vulgaris. It might be toxic:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senecio_vulgaris#Reputation_for_being_noxious_and_toxic

    Reply
  • Passerby

    My grandmother knows these things; time to pick her brain. Great article.

    Reply
  • fauna smith

    I have a friend that used to make tinctures with vinegar instead of alchohol. She claimed that they worked just as well. I am quite sure that the recipe was the same except for that.

    Reply
  • LIZ MERRILL

    i have twigs and leaves from a specific bush that i want to tincture. Should i first boil the twigs and leaves in water for about 15 minutes, then add same amount of alcohol as water to make a tincture from twigs and leaves?

    Liz

    Reply
  • Debra Harper

    The Website to join the free webinar on edible weeds is not correct I couldn't access it and it said it wasn't a valid site......

    Reply
  • Denise

    Even though these are great ideas, you should also start with a trial dose - i.e. put a few drops on your skin to see if you react to these weeds. If you swell and itch or have a reddening of the test area, don't use them. ALWAYS have a supply of diphenhydramine on hand as well. (Benadryl is the tm name.)

    Reply
  • Fran

    I have been using essential oils and herbs for years, because I have bad reactions to the prescriptions that doctors give to me. I find that they do what they say they will do without the side effects.

    Abby: What did you have removed?

    Reply
  • Jeannie C

    I can find no article. I find an over-lay of readyStore products over a couple of sentences I can't read because of the overlay! Sad!

    Reply
  • Conrad

    "Great info to print out and save." Yes it certainly would be but there doesn't seem to be any way to do that!

    Reply
  • Sandman

    Conrad, turn on our printer and hit ctrl-P. That will print the page.

    Reply
  • jessica

    Wheres the info? Theres nothing on the page.... Nothing loaded but the comments. :(

    Reply
  • Michelle

    When do you take orally and when do you apply topically?

    Reply
  • judy

    Can't get rest of article, just comments.

    Abby, what did you have removed??

    Reply
  • Cassidy Bankemper
    Cassidy Bankemper August 18, 2012 at 8:00 am

    Good piece of writing. Will definitely return to get more information.

    Reply
  • Janet

    Fran & Judy: Abby had her "smart meter“ removed from heer home. Our power company, Pacific Gas & Electric, installed meters that send information back instead of having to be manually "read“, and there have been people that claimed they caused health problems. The only headaches they caused on our household was that the meter shows us using double the electricity we used with a manually-tead meter.

    Reply
  • Weed .. so powerful
    Weed .. so powerful March 5, 2013 at 11:02 am

    What a wonderful thing weed(s) are!

    Reply
  • Jean

    Migaine? You might be allergic to food. Get tested. Or: eat one food and do the pulse test every 15 min's. for 1 hour.

    Reply
  • Jean

    Sorry, meant Migraine! Got up too early!

    Reply
  • fauna smith

    An old neighbor of mine used apple cider vinegar instead of alcohol - do you have any information about this method?

    Reply
  • Sonny

    I also use mullien for asthma in tincture form, lomatium root in tincture form for flu's and infections, Hawthorne tincture to strengthen heart muscles. Always keep on hand 100 proof vodka for tincture usage. I keep quarts of tinctures for medical problems hope you all will start as well. Great for preppers!

    Reply
  • Patty

    i never knew that dandilions and other so called weeds could help so much

    Reply
  • Jaclyn

    I've always been interested by the healing qualities in plants, I'm actually making a garden full of helpful plants at the moment, but still want to learn more about some roots or plants I can put into stews ect. Would be very appreciative if any of you could send me more information on other varieties! :-)

    Reply
  • NameDawnBirdsong
    NameDawnBirdsong July 8, 2013 at 4:11 pm

    Tansy Ragwort is a cumulative toxin to the liver. I'm not kidding! please correct this post!
    "Common groundsel (Senecio vulgaris) is a naturalized herb found across much of Canada in fields and waste places. This plant contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids, which cause irreversible liver damage after chronic exposure. Cattle and horses have died after ingesting common groundsel. Humans use this plant in teas and herbal remedies in some parts of the world. Death occurred after some species of the genus Senecio were ingested. Humans should not ingest foods that contain any plant material from this genus. In a case of prenatal exposure, a mother ingested tea containing an estimated 0.343 mg of senecionine, resulting in fatal veno-occlusive disease in a newborn infant (Huxtable 1989, Spoerke and Smolinske 1990)."

    Reply
  • Nathan Carlos Rupley
    Nathan Carlos Rupley July 12, 2013 at 1:02 am

    As others have noted, common groundsel is a toxic plant.While it can probably be used safely by someone with the proper training, why include it in a brief article for beginners?

    Reply
  • cindasana

    A good brandy also makes an effective tincture, depending on the plant matter you are using. If you're going to dabble in making medicine, which this is, I would definitely recommend doing some research on it! There are many reputable herbalists out there who have free tutorials, articles, whathaveyou, on how to make these medicines. Learningherbs.com is a good site, Rosemary Gladstar has some videos out there, Kiva Ringtail Rose is brilliant, Mountain Rose Herbs have a lot of "how to" videos as well...the list goes on and on. Overall, very easy to do, just make sure you have your information first! :)

    Reply
  • AMom

    Great information. Herbs are always a plus to have in a Bug Out Bag. Dandelion tea, or chewing on the roots, (dried or fresh), helps to detox the body and rid it of that morning water retention some of us are prone to. Be sure not to dig up a dandelion from a yard that has been sprayed with some sort of lawn care stuff.

    Reply
  • Beth

    I Couldn't See The Graphic. :(

    Reply
  • Mongo

    very nice
    Do you have or can you recommend a book with colure pictures and look a likes for medicinal and edible plants?

    Reply
  • Sharon k

    I love all this information about weeds. I think they are safer than the medicines we take. It worked for the Indians. S kay

    Reply
  • Sarah

    using vinegar instead of alcohol will work but research the ratios. Also understand that herbs have different chemical compounds that can be soluble in different ways. Sometimes, a plant is best when you use oil, as the good constituents in the Plant are only oil soluable. Other times they're water soluable or alcohol soluable. Do your research to find the best methods of extraction making for the herbs you are wanting to extract and the purpose you'll be using the extraction for.

    Reply
  • Nikiel

    Senecio will!!! give you a cancer:)

    Reply
  • Northwoods Cheryl
    Northwoods Cheryl April 18, 2015 at 2:10 am

    I have a fair amount of a pure grain alcohol called "Everclear" in my storage for use in making medicinal tinctures. It's fairly cheap. DON'T use rubbing alcohols in things taken internally. Serious gastric problems could result. Also, spend time learning about the things that grow in YOUR area, and commit to memory, or at least print on paper. DON'T assume having it on a digital format of any kind is a safe way to store info!! Regardless of if you have a solar charger for your tablet or whatever, tablets and electronic devices can be stolen, broken, gotten wet, EMP'd or whatever

    Reply
  • Thelma J Palmer
    Thelma J Palmer April 18, 2015 at 3:09 am

    I love this kind of helpful info i hate perscriptiong drug and i am always looking for natural healing methods and of course GOD gave uw
    HIS healing garden in the form of weeds which is really Food for out bodies.. Thank you so much everyone for your impot.
    God bless all of you.

    Reply
  • Iain greener

    These are all very well in making tinctures etc with all these plants but we in south Africa don't get some of these herbs and plants. But there are many plants that we have that are equally usefull in more ways than one. It the common aloes are used to make snuff,a herbal tea ,and very good for stings from insects and jellyfish,they are also used to quench the thirst as well .

    Reply
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