Bee Ready with Honey

The sweet, rich flavor of honey is something that everyone loves. Thankfully, it’s also a great food storage item!

Honey can be used in hundreds of recipes, can be used for different purposes and has an amazingly long shelf life. Below, we’ve listed just a few of the benefits of honey and explaining why you should have honey in your food storage!

Share this article with friends and family so they can see the multiple uses of honey.

What are the benefits of Honey in your food storageYou Can Make Your Hair Beautiful
After you take a shower, coat the ends of your hair with honey. Let it sit for a few minutes and then rinse your hair. It should take care of frizzy ends. It will also make your hair more shiny and bright by adding 1 tsp of honey to 1 quart of water. Wash your hair with the mixture and let your hair dry.

Fights Infection
Honey is a great source of healing power. Honey helps you fight infections, aids in tissue healing and helps reduce inflammation and scarring. It can also help you grow stronger and healthier skin. With food storage, you want to have enough nutrients, but you also want food that will make you healthier!

Baking Substitute
If you’re using your food storage for baking, honey can be a great replacement option. Instead of using sugar, you can substitute honey cup or cup. However, you will need to decrease other liquids in the recipe by ¼ per 1 cup of honey.

However, it should be noted that some types of honey will turn into a glue-like substance when they are heated above 108 degrees Fahrenheit. This can be hard to eat and if difficult to digest.

Amazing Shelf Life
Honey in a sealed container can stay good for decades or even centuries. Honey can change color during its storage life and might change color. Depending on the temperature of the storage location, this can give you a 2-year shelf life. However, if stored in a cool, dry location, honey can last for decades.

Just Stir It Up to Prepare
Many times, people will open their honey and it has become solid. Granulation, crystallization or sugaring can occur with pure honey. However, this is easily reversed. It doesn’t mean that the honey is rotten or bad. Just take a pan and boil some water. Turn the heat off and place the container into the boiling water. Leave it until both the water and the container have cooled.

Honey Food StorageDiaper Rash
Probably not the first thing that comes to mind, but you can use honey to relieve diaper rash and chafing. The sugar in the honey absorbs water, keeping bacteria from causing infection. However, it’s not recommended to feed honey to children under 12 months of age. It can cause botulism.

Go the Extra Mile
Honey can actually help you perform better in physical activity. Ancient Olympians would eat honey with dried figs and modern science has shown the benefits. Honey will help you maintain glycogen levels and improve your recovery time better than other sweeteners.

Extra Vitamins and Minerals
Raw Honey and Pure Honey contain vitamins, minerals and enzymes that aren’t found in refined honey. Honey also doesn’t contain fat or cholesterol. The Food and Drug Administration considers honey “sodium free.”

Gluten Free Food Storage
Honey is also a naturally gluten-free product. It’s also free of other allergens

Alright, Let’s Discuss
So, what have you used honey for? Have you found an amazing health benefit for honey in your diet? Share the knowledge below and share this article with your friends and family.

32 thoughts on “Bee Ready with Honey”

  • Dean Klein

    Mix equal parts honey and plain yogurt. Apply it to your face. Wait for ten minutes or so. Rinse it off.

    Reply
  • Steve S.

    Is this honey actually "raw" without any processing? It is my understanding that only "raw" honey has antibiotic qualities when applied to wounds.

    Reply
    • Northwoods Cheryl
      Northwoods Cheryl July 18, 2015 at 4:47 am

      Yup, Steve, you're right!!

      Reply
    • Toby

      Actually, it is the high sugar content that will not promote bacterial growth and draws off moisture. Combine that with a thick cover where ambient contamination can not get access to the wound, and it is pretty effective. The last thing I have read on Honey, is that the wound bed reacts with the honey to form Hydrogen Peroxide.

      I don't know if there are additional anti bodies in raw honey, but raw honey sure tastes good, LOL!

      Reply
  • Alex

    Honey + water + yeast + time = mead, one of the oldest, if not the oldest form of alcohol.

    Reply
  • Adrian

    As a rule, if the honey is crystal clear, its not welcome in our home. Its a form and a fashion of honey without the power thereo. And its often an amalgamation of honeys(or is it honies?) From ,literally, heaven knows where,specificly. Honey is used ampelly in my rootbeer glaze on baked ham. Syrups just arnt the same. Its also a great addition to apple pie, halfing the white sugar with honey. Technically if the "honey" is void of pollen, vitamens, minerals,an bee imparted benefits, its not actually
    honey at all.

    Reply
    • Toby

      Adrian, Raw honey can be very clear. I get honey from clover that looks a lot like corn syrup, except is is more viscious. One of my bee buddies by the Rose garden gets a little pink honey that smells like roses. Another by the Pepsi plant gets dark honey that smells like cola (laze bees, LOL) so the source has a great deal to do with the honey, The clover honey sinks to the bottom and will not mix with the more normal honey, but it is GOOD! Get some bees, it actually is fun!

      Reply
  • Paula

    When my son was younger, allergies and colds often brought on asthma symptoms, sometimes requiring me to break out the nebulizer. My mom (who lives overseas) told me she saw a doctor who specialized in treating asthma on a talk show recommending a concoction of honey and fresh pineapple to prevent asthma flare-ups: 1 cup pure honey, 1/4 to 1/2 cup fresh cubed pineapple, simmmer 20 mins, cool and store in fridge. I decided since it wasn't difficult and would surely do no harm, it was worth a try so I'd give my son 1 tablespoon several times a day when an episode was coming on. Don't know how it worked, but found myself rarely needing the nebulizer after that.

    Reply
  • Jeff Nieland

    Honey is great to put on burns. It not only serves as a topical protectant to the burned area itself, but also provides antibacterial qualities to help fight infections, which is a major concern with burn injuries.

    Reply
  • Ken

    Honey & Cinnamon together, you lose weight...working on 14lbs no exercise. and it will get you off stomach med's...

    Reply
  • Dustin K

    We are so excited that you are carrying Cox's Honey. We have had it for years and there is no other kind we will buy. We were told that they do not pasteurize or filter the honey and that is why we buy it. It is great honey!

    Reply
  • Susan Baird

    Taking raw honey right before you go to bed is very beneficial to refueling your brain. As we sleep our brain works to refuel itself. It takes glycogen from your liver. If there is insufficient glycogen in your liver then your brain works harder as it tries to find and build glycogen from other parts of your body. This is one reason for feeling tired when you wake up in the morning. A tablespoon of raw honey right before bed puts the needed glycogen in your liver for your brain to refuel.

    Reply
  • Jeff Nieland

    Have a sore throat?

    Take a spoon-full of honey all by itself. It is very soothing on inflamed tissue and has the additional benefit of its antibacterial activity.

    Some prefer to mix it with warm water. The warmth seems to offer greater effect.

    Never hurts to add a little fresh-squeezed lemon.

    Reply
  • Elmer

    For pain take 2 teaspoons of Honey and one teaspoon of cinnamon in an 8 ounce glass of warm water take up to 2 per day.

    This was taken from a Swiss Clinic test - some people were healed, and some improved their condition, others still had their level of pain reduced

    Reply
  • TIMMY

    Honey and Cinnamon in my coffee in the morning-eases Arthritis dramatically.
    Also, Mead, which is Honey wine, helps to ease the pain of arthritis. A small shot glass before bed, and it also helps you to sleep better.

    Reply
  • Deb

    Make up a 1/2 pint jar of honey, 1/2 of a lemon sliced thin and thinly sliced ginger. Store it in your frig for approx. 6 weeks then just add a teaspoon of the honey to tea or warm water for winter sore throats; works very well!

    Reply
  • Dawn

    Love all the ideas for use but we know sugar is bad for diabetics, what about honey??

    Reply
  • Disaster Survival Jane

    I have a wonderful recipe for gluten-free chocolate chip cookies that are made with honey and olive oil.

    Reply
  • Diane

    Went to disaster Survival Jane's site and couldn't find the gluten-free chocolate chip cookies made with honey. Can you send me the recipe? Thanks

    Reply
  • Diane

    Ken,
    You wrote about combining Honey and cinnamon to help you lose weight. What is the amount of each and how often?
    Thanks
    Diane

    Ken wrote:

    Honey & Cinnamon together, you lose weight…working on 14lbs no exercise. and it will get you off stomach med’s…
    October 2nd, 2012 at 12:11 pm

    Reply
  • Disaster Survival Jane

    Diane,

    My mistake, the recipe is not Gluten-Free, it calls for Spelt Flour, but if you can eat wheat, it is a really simple but good recipe. Here it is:

    Carob Chip Cookies

    Cream together:
    · 1 cup light tasting olive oil
    · 1 cup honey
    · 2 tsp vanilla
    Add:
    · 1 tsp baking soda
    · 4 cups Spelt Flour
    · 1/2 tsp salt
    · 12 oz carob chips

    Bake at 375 for 7-9 minutes


    Note: You can alter this recipe to make oatmeal cookies with raisins, almond butter cookies…etc.

    Disaster Survival Jane

    Reply
  • Vicci

    My 23year old son Sloan nearly lost a foot as result of a stingray barb. Three hospitalizations, two surgeries, and lots of antibiotics and pain Meds. At wound care (every other day) they applied Medi-honey. The infection stopped and the wound closed, no need for a skin graft. Honey is now an important part of my preps!

    Reply
    • Northwoods Cheryl
      Northwoods Cheryl July 18, 2015 at 4:52 am

      I am a nurse. I can vouch for the healing effects of honey! We had a diabetic lady who had a surgical site that wouldn't heal for 18 months. We then tried raw honey and it completely healed in 3 weeks, and without raising her blood sugar. Medihoney WORKS, but is VERY expensive.

      Reply
  • Ann

    Diane, I have been putting one teaspoon cinnamon ( I use Korean) with 2 teaspoons of honey in my morning coffee. I have lost 5 lbs. in two months. No diet, no extra exercise, nothing. I also feel more energized and my pollen allergies have disappeared. It is recommened that you take the concoction with hot water morning and at night but I didn't care for the taste of plain water. I hope this helps.

    Reply
  • nd okie gurl

    We use raw honey for wounds on ourselves and on our animals. I also love it in green tea with cinnamon.

    Reply
  • Keith C

    Not an expert on honey to be sure, but I do work at a health food store and can attest to the healing powers of honey.

    Here's the thing though. I've been told by people in passing conversations that only raw honey is good for wound treatment. I routinely use cheap, store-bought (NOT RAW) honey to treat my wounds from work, and it works incredibly well. Granted, it's more of a sealing agent than an antibiotic, but it works well.

    In my job, I do a lot of stocking and work with a ton of cardboard which dries out my skin. It's common for me to get deep gashes in my hands/fingers because of the cardboard drying out my hands. I can put a few drops of even the cheapest, generic honey on these wounds, seal it with a band aid and have my wound closed up in a day or two. Granted, because of work and the possibility of re-opening the wound, it may take a couple of days of doing this, but it works. Pretty amazing actually.

    Reply
    • Northwoods Cheryl
      Northwoods Cheryl July 18, 2015 at 4:57 am

      I have been a nurse for 32 years and can vouch for the healing properties of honey, especially in deeper wounds. If not raw honey, I think it works because most bacterias can't grow in a high acid environment. Both sugar and honey are high acid so work pretty well. I healed a HUGE wound a horse had gotten with a steel fencepost, by putting sugar in the wound 2x a day, rinsing out the old stuff first with lukewarm water. Then just "toss" in the sugar. The vet was amazed! An Amishman told me about the sugar cure, and it worked!

      Reply
  • Name: shuggie
    Name: shuggie June 23, 2014 at 6:22 am

    funny no one mentioned "HOT TODDY",FOR chest congestion. mix tsp lemon juice,tsp whisky,tsp honey
    in a cup hot water,at night. you will sweat it off!
    worked many times for me.give kids a tsp or 2.adults
    drink the whole cup.

    Reply
  • Warren

    Please proof read your articles. Yes, honey is a very good food storage item.

    Reply
    • Brian

      I agree with Warren that the article needs proof-reading and editing. There are so many errors, it makes it hard to take seriously.

      Reply
      • Northwoods Cheryl
        Northwoods Cheryl July 18, 2015 at 5:04 am

        If you are "stopped" by a few typo's then sadly, you are missing the entire benefit of the article. Everyone needs to learn to "go with the flow" occasionally. Not only is it a free read, but no one here claims to be a professional writer. It's a blog, not a book. Flexibility is a very big part of learning.

        Reply
  • Barra the Bard / Barra Jacob-McDowell

    As a performer (Celtic storytelling, singer and musician), I need to keep my voice in good shape! A few years ago, I got a horrible cold before Thanksgiving that lasted until after New Year's. Just in time for holiday gigs! With larynxitis adding to the problem, I was especially concerned about doing a 45-min. program of storytelling, harping and singing for a women's luncheon group in Dec. My friend Bob Shimer, who's a storyteller, magician, and ventriloquist, told me his Vent Mix recipe, formulated by a French vocal surgeon. Get an ordinary teaspoon. Fill half of it with softened butter, and the other half with honey (I prefer buckwheat); dust the entire thing with ground thyme. Insert into the mouth, mix with your tongue, and swallow. Tastes better than it sounds! I took this right before performing, and my voice held out for the entire program.
    Also, my granny's posset is wonderful for colds! (Imagine this in a Highland Scottish burr): Put the kettle on to boil. Get out your favorite mug or prettiest cup and saucer, and a silver spoon. Into the cup/mug, put 1 tbsp. Cider vinegar and 1 tsp. honey; fill up with the boiling water. Stir with the silver spoon. Drink as hot as you can bear it. The steam from the hot water will help clear out your head; the cider vinegar will cut phlegm and give it a nice apple-y taste; the honey will soothe your throat and sweeten it, plus the good things in honey; and the pretty cup and silver spoon are to make you feel pampered... Oh, and in cases of snakebite and frostbite, add a wee dram of good single malt whisky--for medicinal purposes, of course.

    Reply
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