How Many Calories Do You Need in Your Food Storage

Written by Clayton Krebs

When shopping for a food storage, one of the major questions you’ll have to answer is how many calories you need to consume on a daily basis.

This will effect how big your food storage supply is and your plans on daily dieting with food storage items.

Weight
Weight is a estimation factor when considering how many calories you need to consume on a daily basis. You can also factors in body fat percentage. The higher your muscle mass, the higher caloric requirements you’ll have. The higher your fat mass, the lower your caloric needs.

Age
Depending on your age, your body has different requirements for calories. Here is a table showing some recommended calorie intakes for different ages.

Food Storage Caloric Needs
Age
Male
Female
2-3 years old

1,000-1,400

1,000-1,400
4-8 years old
1,200-1,800
1,200-1,800
9-13 years old
1,800-2,600
1,600-2,200
14-18 years old
2,200-3,200
1,800-2,400
19-30 years old
2,400-3,000
2,000-2,400
31-50 years old
2,200-3,200
1,800-2,400
51+ years old
2,000-2,800
1,600-2,200

Notice how a person’s caloric needs increase through their life and then decrease after a certain age. Also take into consideration that some food storage kits last for 20-30 years. If you child is 4 now, they might be an adult by the time the food storage kit expires.

Daily activity levels - calories in food storageDaily Activity Levels
One of the major factors to consider with your caloric intake is your how active you are in your life style.

You’ll want to assess what activity category you fall under:

Sedentary: Activities of daily living only (dressing, cooking, walking to and from the car, etc.). No purposeful exercise.

Light Activity: Activities of daily living, plus the equivalent of walking 2 miles (or about 4,000 steps) per day.

Moderate Activity: Activities of daily living, plus activities like brisk walking (15-20 minutes per mile), dancing, skating, leisurely bicycling, golfing, doubles tennis, mowing the lawn, or yoga 3-5 days per week.

Heavy Activity: Activities of daily living, plus moderate exercise or vigorous exercise (jogging, running, swimming, singles tennis, soccer, basketball, digging, carpentry) most days of the week.

Exceptional Activity: Activities of daily living, plus intensive training for an exercise event like a marathon, triathlon, century bike ride, etc.

Harris-Benedict Formula
There is a formula that will help you determine your caloric needs based on your activity level. However, you’ll first need to determine your Basal Metabolic Rate:

BMR

Women: BMR = 655 + ( 4.35 x weight in pounds ) + ( 4.7 x height in inches ) – ( 4.7 x age in years )
Men: BMR = 66 + ( 6.23 x weight in pounds ) + ( 12.7 x height in inches ) – ( 6.8 x age in year )

Once you have your BMR, you can plug that information into this equation, based on your activity level, in order to assess how many calories you’ll need on a daily basis.
Sedentary: BMR x 1.2
Lightly active: BMR x 1.375
Moderately active: BMR x 1.55
Very active: BMR x 1.725
Extra active: BMR x 1.9

Updated March 28, 2012

One Comment

  1. Bill wrote:

    This is good information to know.

    March 29th, 2012 at 11:47 pm

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