How to Make a Paracord Keychain

Written by Brandon Garrett

Paracord can be an awesome tool in your preparedness arsenal. This durable nylon rope can be tied into tons of different designs including bracelets, strengthened cords, pouches and more. If you’re in an emergency, you simply unwind the strong cord and use it to bind, haul or anything else that you might need.

So, whether you’re a beginner or an expert paracord lover, we have a design for you. Check out these paracord designs below. If you don’t want to spend time weaving your own bracelet, you can always let us do it for you.

What is Paracord?
Make your own paracord KeychainParacord, also known as parachute cord, is a soft, lightweight nylon rope that was originally used for parachuting. Typically, 550 paracord (which is the paracord used for our bracelets) is made of 32 strands of nylon sheath on the outside and seven strands of 2-ply nylon yarns on the inside (the “guts”). The 550 paracord is the same made for the government and has a minimum breaking strength of 550 lbs.

While paracord started out as a parachuters tool, people quickly recognized its usefulness in other areas. Since the cord is quick-drying, rot- and mildew-resistant, it’s great for many purposes. Military units use it for securing packs, hanging covers and tents. Many military personnel even use the guts as fishing line.

Check out these designs:

Bracelets
Paracord Bracelet
Paracord Snake Design
Paracord Woven Watchband
Paracord Belt Design

Paracord Keychain
• 3 strands of Paracord measuring about 40 inches long each
• Scissors
• Lighter
• Ruler or tape measure
• Masking Tape

1. Gather the three strands together and then measure from one end down to 17 3/4 inches. Hold the three strands at the 17 3/4 point, and then grab a strip of tape to secure the paracord together (make sure to place the tape edge against the 17 3/4 point).

2. Begin braiding the three strands by bringing the outermost right-hand strand over to the left. Then bring the outermost left-hand strand over the strand to its right. Continue this process of right-to-left until the braid length is 3 1/2 inches long and then tape the strands together to hold them in place at the point you just measured.

3. Bring both taped ends together forming a loop; securing them together with a strip of tape. From the top of the strip of tape (the loop end), measure down 2 1/4 inches and then secure the strands with tape at that point.

Tying the Crown Sinnet
The knot used to tie the fender is called a Crown Sinnet and can make a great looking decorative design to wrap objects in paracord.

4. From the bottom of the tape, bring the strands back up towards the loop.
5. To tie the Crown Sinnet, make a backward “C” from each strand laying each strand on top of its neighbor to the left.
6. Pull the strands tight.
7. Repeat the same procedure laying each strand on top of its neighbor to the left. Pull the strands tight and repeat until you reach the end of the tape.

Finish
8. Begin the steps to tie the Crown Sinnet but this time, instead of going over the top of every strand’s neighbor and pulling tight, go under each strand and pull it tight.
9. Once you’ve tied your last knot, tuck each of the loose ends under their neighbors and behind the strands as shown:

10. Use the scissors to cut the cord as close to the final knot as possible.
11. Use the lighter to singe the edges and keep them from loosening.

Thanks to SyberProdigy.com for this design.

Updated January 3, 2013

7 Comments

  1. JB wrote:

    Love it. Thanks.

    January 5th, 2013 at 7:04 am
  2. Javior wrote:

    Its quality 550 cord, the same as the cgroade I have bought through other companies and on military bases. Only problem was it wasnt the cgroade color listed in the description and it says nothing about color varying. It says desert camo when I received a dark green camo. So review is more over company rather than the cord itself.

    January 18th, 2013 at 1:32 pm
  3. Jeffrey wrote:

    Instruction #1 is pretty clear that you should place the tape at the 17 3/4″ inch mark. But which ends do you begin braid in? The 17 3/4″ or the 22 1/4″ ends?

    February 6th, 2013 at 7:35 pm
  4. Kelly wrote:

    Dude, next time you make instructions you should pick colors that we can actually see what you are doing. Other then that great instructions. :-)

    November 2nd, 2013 at 7:46 pm
  5. k wrote:

    Instructions suck

    December 24th, 2013 at 1:59 pm
  6. N wrote:

    What if you wanted to make it longer then the 3 1/2in long, how would I calculate it to 5in?

    March 11th, 2014 at 8:49 am
  7. orlando jones wrote:

    hmmm looks almost possible, but can u repost with contrasting colors so we can see which cord goes over which one, have black on black is difficult to see. thx.

    November 29th, 2014 at 11:28 pm

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